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john-jantsch

John Jantsch

Founder of Duct Tape Marketing

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“Social Surround” Your Customers: 5 Keys

November 20, 2014

Employing tools and routines that give you a deeper glimpse into what your customers care about, are doing each day, can’t find enough of, are looking for, just accomplished, just completed, just lost, just attended, or just got let down by is how you discover ways to serve, add value, and build deeper relationships.

While the title of this post could sound a little stalker-ish, the fact is you can better serve your customers and attract new ones when you use social media to create a more complete picture of your ideal customer’s world.

Employing tools and routines that give you a deeper glimpse into what your customers care about, are doing each day, can’t find enough of, are looking for, just accomplished, just completed, just lost, just attended, or just got let down by is how you discover ways to serve, add value, and build deeper relationships.

Below are five elements of a social surround game plan.

  1. The usual suspects
  2. It should probably go without saying that the first step is to friend, follow, and like. Make sure that the social network activity on the biggest networks is at your fingertips. Social CRM tools like Nimble make it easy to view a more complete customer record, and browser add-ons like Rapportive bring social data into email tools such as Gmail. Create Twitter lists of customers and prospects, and quickly scan them for actionable bits using a tool like Hootsuite.

  3. Go deeper
  4. Don’t stop at simply connecting with your customers on LinkedIn. Take a good hard look at who else they connect to, who influences them, and who they report to. Most networks will show you who someone follows, and understanding this can lead to opportunities to connect deeper through already shared connections, find new avenues for expanded business with existing customers, and better understand how your customers network. Look at a customer’s “favorited” Tweets, check out Klout to see who your customer interacts with most, and see what groups your customer participates in on LinkedIn for additional clues into what your customer’s passions might be. Sometimes learning more about who else your customer is connected to is more important than simply connecting.

  5. Custom listening
  6. Now it’s time to get smarter about what’s going on in your customer’s world and use that information to add value. Use a tool like Talkwalker to set up custom alerts that relate to your customer’s market or product, and look for ways to share this information with your customer. Create industry or keyword-specific pages in Scoop.it, or aggregate the best blogs posts on an industry by using a tool like AllTop, and simply share four or five interesting links in what amounts to a custom newsletter.

  7. Subscribe and join
  8. Don’t forget to subscribe to your customer’s blog and newsletter. Sign up for their in-person and online events, and use your listening tools from above to keep up on announcements and news. Make sure that you have easy access to all of the content your customers are putting out, as it can often provide clues for new opportunities and relationship building discussion points.

  9. Create connection
  10. My final point is a big one. When you effectively mine your customer’s social graph looking for deeper understanding, you are more prepared to help them meet all of their objectives, even those not related to your business – and that’s how you create unbelievable value and loyalty. Use your listening, connecting, and mining routines to look for opportunities to create connections for your customers. Introduce them to journalists you’ve built relationships with. Connect them with that killer programmer you saw them Tweet about needing. Help them fill the VP of Sales position they just mentioned on LinkedIn.

When you employ the right tools and routines to monitor and engage in this manner, social media participation will always pay off.

This article originally appeared on www.inc.com/comcast.

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